Freudenberg - Innovating Together

Freudenberg - Innovating Together

History

 

 

The Tanneryhttp://www.freudenberg-group.ru/en/company/history/Pages/The-Tannery.aspxThe Tannery<p><img class="ms-rtePosition-1" src="/FCOContentImages/pi_01_04_01.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;" />In 1849, Carl Johann Freudenberg and his partner Heinrich Christian Heintze took over a tannery in the Müllheim valley near Weinheim after the liquidation of the Heintze and Sammet company. With new, fashionable products such as patent leather and satin leather, the company grew and exported all over the world. </p><p>Between 1900 and 1904, in the course of his own experiments, Hermann Ernst Freudenberg, son of the company's founder, became the first European to develop a tanning process using chrome liquor instead of vegetable dyes. This invention reduced production time by months, and Freudenberg became one of the biggest tanneries in Europe. </p><p>The period of the First World War, inflation and the economic crisis of 1929 hit the company hard. Until then, 60-70 percent of the leather produced had been exported. Exports suddenly became impossible, and the founder's grandchildren faced the question: Where do we go from here? </p>1849 - 1929
Diversificationhttp://www.freudenberg-group.ru/en/company/history/Pages/Diversification.aspxDiversification<p><img class="ms-rtePosition-1" src="/FCOContentImages/pi_01_04_02.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;" />The grandchildren of company founder Carl Johann Freudenberg - engineer Hans Freudenberg, personnel and finance manager Richard Freudenberg, sales manager Otto Freudenberg and purchasing manager Walter Freudenberg ventured out on a new enterprise strategy. </p><p>First, they began by reworking leather residues and then developing substitute materials for leather. For example, from 1929, the company started manufacturing leather seals and from 1936 radial shaft seals with a sealing lip made of "Perbunan" synthetic rubber. The trade name for these radial shaft seals - "Simmerring" - became a technical term in its own right. </p><p>Working with Buna S and Buna N synthetic rubber, chemists and engineers at Freudenberg developed synthetic leather and rubber soles and finally floorcoverings and nonwovens, which were originally derived as a further development of the base material for synthetic leather. Nonwovens were soon recognized as universally applicable materials: nonwoven interlinings under the name of "Vlieseline" and household products under the "Vileda" brand have been available since 1948 and, since 1957, nonwovens have been used in a constantly expanding and developing range of filters for industry and the consumer market under the name of "Viledon". Since 1934, seals and molded products have been custom-designed to special dimensions for Freudenbergs customers. </p>1929 - 1949
International Expansionhttp://www.freudenberg-group.ru/en/company/history/Pages/International-Expansion.aspxInternational Expansion<p>​<img class="ms-rtePosition-1" src="/FCOContentImages/pi_01_04_03.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;width:220px;height:146px;" />The post-war reconstruction period also brought the opportunity to invest again outside Germany. Before the war, the company had operated production sites in Austria, Switzerland, France and Great Britain. In 1951, Freudenberg began producing nonwovens with an American partner in the USA. In 1955, a molded products factory was added, and in 1968 a participation in a seal manufacturing company was acquired.  </p><p>At the same time, investment in Europe also continued: participations and fully-owned plants in Great Britain, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Italy and other European countries were established, and, in 1960, investments in Japan were added to the list. Finally, from 1970 to 1989, Freudenberg built up a global network of production and sales locations, including in North, Central and South America, Australia, South Africa and East Asia. </p><p>The product range was also expanded. Between 1962 and 1965, the spunbonded nonwovens process was developed in-house. This technology is now used for applications in medicine, agriculture and the processing industry. In 1966, Freudenberg acquired the lubricants manufacturer Klüber Lubrication, and in 1982 the company ventured into the production of flexible printed circuits together with its Japanese partners. </p>1950 - 1995
Customer-orientated company structurehttp://www.freudenberg-group.ru/en/company/history/Pages/Customer-orientated-company-structure.aspxCustomer-orientated company structure<p><img class="ms-rtePosition-1" src="/FCOContentImages/pi_01_04_04.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;" />Freudenberg faced new challenges as the world changed with the disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the opening of Eastern Europe and China.</p><p>To ensure fast and flexible operations, smaller business units, each specializing in a specific market, were established. The old company Carl Freudenberg was split up into independent limited partnerships in 1995, with Freudenberg & Co. Kommanditgesellschaft assuming the role of the parent company for the new subsidiaries. </p><p>Since 1996 Freudenberg has focused on forward-looking fields of business. Between 1999 and 2002, Freudenberg sold its shoe activities (Tack, Elefanten) and closed the tannery, thus parting with leather production, its original business. At the same time, the Freudenberg Group strengthened its commitment in strategic fields of business. The purchase of large sections of the business of Burgmann Dichtungswerke in 2004 strengthened the Seals and Vibration Control Technology Business Area. In the same year, the Group purchased Chem-Trend, the US release agent manufacturer. Together with Klüber Lubrication and the lubricant manufacturer OKS, the American company became part of the newly established Business Group called Freudenberg Chemical Specialities. The Household Products Business Area, too, expanded with international acquisitions. </p>since 1996